Creating Business Visibility!

Archive for the ‘display banners’ Category

Using Our Feather Flag Templates

Getting your art files correct and using our art templates for your feather banner, flying flag banner or tear drop banner. These templates are made to take the guess work out of producing art files for your feather flag banner and making sure you get great results. Wind flags or feather flags are a great way to get attention for your business and we have these templates available to make it as easy as possible.

Mesh Banner for Good Neighbors

Owning a sign business has its advantages. We watched in horror as a developer took away our fantastic view and put condos 10 feet from our back fence. What to do? Our solution was to put up a mesh banner with a image of our former view. We think it turned out great!

Mesh Banners Can Be Used For A Variety of Sign Applications

One of the practical and pragmatic parts of using mesh banners are the ability for wind to pass through the image. This puts less strain and stress onto the supporting poles and also allows sunlight to pass through. In our case it didn’t completely block out the sun so our new neighbors could still enjoy the sunshine without having to see us, or us them!

So don’t forget to put this option into your mix of choices when coming up with a solution for your banner and sign needs.

Have Questions? Here Are Answers!

Have you seen our FAQ’s page? Its a great resource on buying, taking care of and setting up graphics for your feather banners, banners, pull up banners, table throws and more! It has  26 short videos on all aspects of sign creation and you can visit it here,

http://www.eventbannersandsigns.com/faq.aspx

FAQ's page

 

A Simple Guide To Designing Better Banners

Large-format printing is now available to even the most modest of businesses and that means you can make eye-catching banners a potent part of your marketing arsenal. In order to get your money’s worth, though, you need to exercise some care with the design of these marketing tools! This quick guide will get you thinking smarter about how to design your business’s next banner.

Always Start With Clarity

Clarity has to be your watchword when you’re designing a banner. Of course, the obvious meaning here is that your banner should be easily legible to its intended audience, but there are other issues to take into consideration. As with any marketing message, your banner should have a mission. You want to include only what is necessary and cut out anything extraneous.

Like online ads, most banners feature a call to action. This is the step you want your viewer to take after seeing your banner. In many cases, simply providing your contact information can serve as a call to action. If you want your audience to get in touch with you, making your phone number or web address as prominent as possible will serve your purpose. For announcing a sale, spreading information, etc., make sure that the information you’re giving to the viewer dominates the banner.

Simplicity And Boldness

Hopefully, you will already know in advance where your new banner will be displayed. This is important because you want your graphics to stand out from background. Your color choices should favor strong, eye-catching hues, but there needs to be as much contrast as possible between elements.

If at all possible, stick to two or three colors that work well together while maintaining sharp contrast. This will help make your banner more legible and ensure that your viewers get your message quickly.

When it comes to picking elements to include in your banner, don’t overload your audience’s eyeballs. Every piece of information, every graphic, every photo, and every logo should contribute directly to your banner’s intended purpose. For instance, banners that encourage the viewer to contact you, pick one preferred method of contact (phone, email, web URL) and use only that. One large method of contact will work much better than three equal ones.

Getting The Words Right

As far as the nuts-and-bolts design concerns of your banner, you need to hang on to the principles already described above. You should always strive for simplicity and clarity. Don’t use fancy, delicate fonts. Banners need fonts that are legible from a distance. (This is particularly true of outdoor banners!)

Define a clear order for the information you put on your banner. The most important point (usually the call to action) should be dominant. Work to refine your message until you can get it across as succinctly as possible. Subordinate information like details and contacts need to be presented in a way that preserves their legibility but does not distract from your banner’s main message.

Sorting Out The Technicalities

Even the world’s best banner design is going to come out wrong if it’s not sent to the printer in the right way. Make sure the final files you send to your printer are suitable for printing a large-scale banner. It’s always a good idea to review format requirements carefully with your printer before making any commitment; they are after all the professionals.

Generally speaking, there are a few rules of thumb that apply to virtually all banner files. Raster graphics (e.g. photos) need to be provided at a very high resolution, ideally 100 dpi at the final size. If your banner design doesn’t include photos, you should provide it to the printer in vector format. Vector files are ideal for large-scale printing because they can be scaled to any size without losing detail. Adobe Illustrator is the industry standard for vector file creation, but you can find plenty of cheaper alternatives. Finally, don’t forget to check the color settings of your file. Your printer will need a CMYK file in order to make your banner properly. Many image editing programs default to RGB color; you should always convert you files prior to printing them.

Banner design can be a fun and creative part of the marketing process. By taking the time to learn some of the basic principles that go into this art, you’ll stand a much better chance of creating a killer banner the next time you need one. This is by no means an authoritative guide to the topic; you can learn much more on the subject as you gain more banner-creating experience!

Stephanie Song is a freelance writer and self-proclaimed technophile, who loves keeping up with the latest gadgets and technology. You can check out her site, http://www.inktonerstore.com/ for all your quality ink and toner cartridge needs.

Pantone Colors vs CMYK

We are asked to match a pantone color for a banner or sign frequently. What is a pantone color? How do the digital printers of today work to reproduce a pantone match? Here is a short video explaining the process. Still confused on how to set up your banner or sign? Check out our graphic specifications here! You’ll find full explanations of bit map vs vector files, proper color specs and more.

What Makes a Good Sign?

Having spent over 30 years making signs I have found it very easy to spot bad signs, but what makes a good sign? Everyone knows a bad sign when they see it, but what works in making a good sign? First off it has to be readable! Too many signs are designed trying to be cool or hip and the fonts used and graphics incorporated make it impossible to read from any distance. Remember you want your sign to tell people exactly what you do and your offer in a very clear manner. To do that lets go over some of the basics.

1.Use easy to read fonts! If a fancy font is part of your logo fine, but for your message use sans serif type as in helvetica, ariel, or any other easy to read font. Don’t use swirly brush script type fonts to tell your message. They are difficult to read quickly. Legibility is king!

Download a Visibility Chart here!

2. Use a contrasting color combination. Black on yellow, red on yellow. Avoid brown on green or any combination that doesn’t give good contrast and remember that just because it looks good on your letterhead doesn’t mean it will make a good sign.

3. Make sure the size of your sign and lettering is readable to your audience. If it needs to be read from the freeway it has to be considerably larger than if it needs to be seen by people walking by.

4. Experts agree that when it comes to signs, less is better. Seven words or fewer, and no more than three elements per sign.

Your sign should quickly and clearly state three important points:

Who you are — your company name and identity

What you do — this section usually highlights your industry or trade, and is given the greatest prominence

How well you do it — a short slogan or company motto might be used in this area

5. Think in pictures. Graphics and pictures are still worth a thousand words! A picture of a mouth–watering cake may make a greater impact on potential customers than any slogans about baking the best cakes in the county.

There you go, some basics to help you communicate your message to your audience to get return on investment! Of course you can always bring your sign needs to us and we will make sure you get an Attention Getter!

How to Care for Your Banner

We are often asked “how do I take care of my banner?” Here is a short video about that process and a longer article about it follows.

Banners, banner signs, feather banners

Banners, banner signs, feather banners

https://youtu.be/eY_IGc5M860

Most banners these days are made from a 10 oz. or 13 oz. fabric. We use a 13 oz. cool white banner fabric that is certified Flame Retardant. Vinyl banners are waterproof and will usually hold up for a long time in outdoor situations.

CLEANING:

To keep your banners looking fresh, just clean with a sponge and soapy water. Do not scrub or use any harsh abrasive chemical or it could damage the printing. The banner should be completely dry before rehanging or storing.

STORING

Banners should be rolled not folded when stored. Keep them on a tube or rolled neatly and in a clear plastic bag. If the banner has vinyl lettering on it, the lettering should be rolled with the vinyl on the outside. This seems counterintuitive, but if you roll with the letters on the inside it will cause the vinyl to separate from the banner material. With digitally printed banners, you can roll them either way.

HANGING

If your banner was folded or wrinkly, you can use a blow dryer to heat the fabric to cause it to relax. Banners that are hung outdoors in a high wind area can have slits cut in them every two feet or so to allow the wind to pass through. Just take a plastic bowl and cut half moons around the bowl interspersed about the banner, trying to avoid important words or images.

WHAT TO DO WITH YOUR OLD BANNER

We have made banners for businesses that have hung outside on their building for years. We have also seen people wrinkle up their banner, step on it, get it wet and muddy and ruin it in under two weeks time. However long your banner lasts (we hope you get good use out of it), when it will no longer work as a banner, you can use it as a tarp, a covering for wood or something else outdoors, or donate it to a preschool for an art project–the other side is a blank canvas for them and you’d be amazed at what kids will come up with.

Recycled banner fabrics and recyclable banner fabrics are just now coming onto the market. We will be testing several products very soon and offer this as an option for customers who want a totally green banner. We’ll keep you posted on this.

In the mean time, we hope you get a lot of bang for your buck with one of the least expensive ways to advertise for a long time.

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