Creating Business Visibility!

Archive for the ‘digital banners’ Category

Attention Getters in the News!

Kevin and Tracey were interviewed today at Attention Getters by Steve Luke with NBC 7 San Diego for a story about the upcoming tax reform for businesses. Something that doesn’t happen everyday, its great to be on TV!

He gave us a good plug about our biz and the printers we use.  Sometimes the day brings wonderful surprises.

 

Tracey on NBC 7

Have Questions? Here Are Answers!

Have you seen our FAQ’s page? Its a great resource on buying, taking care of and setting up graphics for your feather banners, banners, pull up banners, table throws and more! It has  26 short videos on all aspects of sign creation and you can visit it here,

http://www.eventbannersandsigns.com/faq.aspx

FAQ's page

 

How to Apply Decals or Stickers

Every so often a client wants to apply a vinyl sticker or decal themselves. Its not rocket science but it can be a real challenge if you’ve never done it before. Here is a great lesson video on the process so you can do it properly on your banner, sign or vehicle.

A Simple Guide To Designing Better Banners

Large-format printing is now available to even the most modest of businesses and that means you can make eye-catching banners a potent part of your marketing arsenal. In order to get your money’s worth, though, you need to exercise some care with the design of these marketing tools! This quick guide will get you thinking smarter about how to design your business’s next banner.

Always Start With Clarity

Clarity has to be your watchword when you’re designing a banner. Of course, the obvious meaning here is that your banner should be easily legible to its intended audience, but there are other issues to take into consideration. As with any marketing message, your banner should have a mission. You want to include only what is necessary and cut out anything extraneous.

Like online ads, most banners feature a call to action. This is the step you want your viewer to take after seeing your banner. In many cases, simply providing your contact information can serve as a call to action. If you want your audience to get in touch with you, making your phone number or web address as prominent as possible will serve your purpose. For announcing a sale, spreading information, etc., make sure that the information you’re giving to the viewer dominates the banner.

Simplicity And Boldness

Hopefully, you will already know in advance where your new banner will be displayed. This is important because you want your graphics to stand out from background. Your color choices should favor strong, eye-catching hues, but there needs to be as much contrast as possible between elements.

If at all possible, stick to two or three colors that work well together while maintaining sharp contrast. This will help make your banner more legible and ensure that your viewers get your message quickly.

When it comes to picking elements to include in your banner, don’t overload your audience’s eyeballs. Every piece of information, every graphic, every photo, and every logo should contribute directly to your banner’s intended purpose. For instance, banners that encourage the viewer to contact you, pick one preferred method of contact (phone, email, web URL) and use only that. One large method of contact will work much better than three equal ones.

Getting The Words Right

As far as the nuts-and-bolts design concerns of your banner, you need to hang on to the principles already described above. You should always strive for simplicity and clarity. Don’t use fancy, delicate fonts. Banners need fonts that are legible from a distance. (This is particularly true of outdoor banners!)

Define a clear order for the information you put on your banner. The most important point (usually the call to action) should be dominant. Work to refine your message until you can get it across as succinctly as possible. Subordinate information like details and contacts need to be presented in a way that preserves their legibility but does not distract from your banner’s main message.

Sorting Out The Technicalities

Even the world’s best banner design is going to come out wrong if it’s not sent to the printer in the right way. Make sure the final files you send to your printer are suitable for printing a large-scale banner. It’s always a good idea to review format requirements carefully with your printer before making any commitment; they are after all the professionals.

Generally speaking, there are a few rules of thumb that apply to virtually all banner files. Raster graphics (e.g. photos) need to be provided at a very high resolution, ideally 100 dpi at the final size. If your banner design doesn’t include photos, you should provide it to the printer in vector format. Vector files are ideal for large-scale printing because they can be scaled to any size without losing detail. Adobe Illustrator is the industry standard for vector file creation, but you can find plenty of cheaper alternatives. Finally, don’t forget to check the color settings of your file. Your printer will need a CMYK file in order to make your banner properly. Many image editing programs default to RGB color; you should always convert you files prior to printing them.

Banner design can be a fun and creative part of the marketing process. By taking the time to learn some of the basic principles that go into this art, you’ll stand a much better chance of creating a killer banner the next time you need one. This is by no means an authoritative guide to the topic; you can learn much more on the subject as you gain more banner-creating experience!

Stephanie Song is a freelance writer and self-proclaimed technophile, who loves keeping up with the latest gadgets and technology. You can check out her site, http://www.inktonerstore.com/ for all your quality ink and toner cartridge needs.

Why Does It Look Different On My Monitor?

img-gamut

We send color concepts via email to clients for approval before producing any custom project. When they see the final version we sometimes hear them remark, “But it looked so much brighter on my monitor.” Why is that? It has to do with the different way your monitor produces color versus a digitally printed image. They have a different “color gamut”.

What is color gamut? In layman’s terms it is the difference between what the eye can see, what your monitor can reproduce using RGB and illuminated color, and what the printer can do using subtractive color and reflective light. This is very important to understand when speaking with your clients because it gives everyone involved proper expectations going into a project on what is really available and how it will turn out. What follows is a technical Wikipedia description and the movie link gives you a simple visual look at color gamut and how it works.

“In color theory, the gamut of a device or process is that portion of the color space that can be represented, or reproduced. Generally, the color gamut is specified in the hue–saturation plane, as a system can usually produce colors over a wide intensity range within its color gamut; for a subtractive color system (such as used in printing), the range of intensity available in the system is for the most part meaningless without considering system-specific properties (such as the illumination of the ink).

When certain colors cannot be expressed within a particular color model, those colors are said to be out of gamut. For example, while pure red can be expressed in the RGB color space, it cannot be expressed in the CMYK color space; pure red is out of gamut in the CMYK color space.

A device that is able to reproduce the entire visible color space is an unrealized goal within the engineering of color displays and printing processes. While modern techniques allow increasingly good approximations, the complexity of these systems often makes them impractical.

While processing a digital image, the most convenient color model used is the RGB model. Printing the image requires transforming the image from the original RGB color space to the printer’s CMYK color space. During this process, the colors from the RGB which are out of gamut must be somehow converted to approximate values within the CMYK space gamut. Simply trimming only the colors which are out of gamut to the closest colors in the destination space would burn the image. There are several algorithms approximating this transformation, but none of them can be truly perfect, since those colors are simply out of the target device’s capabilities. This is why identifying the colors in an image which are out of gamut in the target color space as soon as possible during processing is critical for the quality of the final product.”

For more information on the different aspects of graphics visit our faq’s page here,

http://www.eventbannersandsigns.com/faq.aspx

Pantone Colors vs CMYK

We are asked to match a pantone color for a banner or sign frequently. What is a pantone color? How do the digital printers of today work to reproduce a pantone match? Here is a short video explaining the process. Still confused on how to set up your banner or sign? Check out our graphic specifications here! You’ll find full explanations of bit map vs vector files, proper color specs and more.

How to Care for Your Banner

We are often asked “how do I take care of my banner?” Here is a short video about that process and a longer article about it follows.

Banners, banner signs, feather banners

Banners, banner signs, feather banners

https://youtu.be/eY_IGc5M860

Most banners these days are made from a 10 oz. or 13 oz. fabric. We use a 13 oz. cool white banner fabric that is certified Flame Retardant. Vinyl banners are waterproof and will usually hold up for a long time in outdoor situations.

CLEANING:

To keep your banners looking fresh, just clean with a sponge and soapy water. Do not scrub or use any harsh abrasive chemical or it could damage the printing. The banner should be completely dry before rehanging or storing.

STORING

Banners should be rolled not folded when stored. Keep them on a tube or rolled neatly and in a clear plastic bag. If the banner has vinyl lettering on it, the lettering should be rolled with the vinyl on the outside. This seems counterintuitive, but if you roll with the letters on the inside it will cause the vinyl to separate from the banner material. With digitally printed banners, you can roll them either way.

HANGING

If your banner was folded or wrinkly, you can use a blow dryer to heat the fabric to cause it to relax. Banners that are hung outdoors in a high wind area can have slits cut in them every two feet or so to allow the wind to pass through. Just take a plastic bowl and cut half moons around the bowl interspersed about the banner, trying to avoid important words or images.

WHAT TO DO WITH YOUR OLD BANNER

We have made banners for businesses that have hung outside on their building for years. We have also seen people wrinkle up their banner, step on it, get it wet and muddy and ruin it in under two weeks time. However long your banner lasts (we hope you get good use out of it), when it will no longer work as a banner, you can use it as a tarp, a covering for wood or something else outdoors, or donate it to a preschool for an art project–the other side is a blank canvas for them and you’d be amazed at what kids will come up with.

Recycled banner fabrics and recyclable banner fabrics are just now coming onto the market. We will be testing several products very soon and offer this as an option for customers who want a totally green banner. We’ll keep you posted on this.

In the mean time, we hope you get a lot of bang for your buck with one of the least expensive ways to advertise for a long time.

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